Types of Deeds

A general warranty deed is a type of deed where the "grantor" (seller) guarantees that he or she holds clear title to a piece of real estate and has a right to sell it to the "grantee" (buyer). The guarantee is not limited to the time the grantor owned the property, rather it extends back to the property's origins.

A special warranty deed is a type of deed where the "grantor" (seller) guarantees that he or she holds clear title to a piece of real estate and has a right to sell it to the "grantee" (buyer). The guarantee is limited to the time the grantor owned the property.

A quitclaim deed is a conveyance by which the grantor transfers whatever interest he or she has in the real estate without warranties or obligations.

A life estate deed is a type of deed in which an interest in real property is limited in duration to the lifetime of the grantor or some other designated person and upon the death of that person, the real property automatically passes to another person.

An executor's deed is executed by the person appointed to administer the estate of a deceased person to transfer an interest in real property. The probate court must approve any sale, transfer, or distribution of property by the executor.

A confirmatory or corrective deed is a conveyance made to correct a mistake or discrepancy in a prior deed.